Madeline Anderson

Madeline Anderson

Pioneering filmmaker and television producer Madeline Anderson is often credited as being the first black woman to produce and direct a televised documentary film, the first black woman to produce and direct a syndicated TV series, the first black employee at New York-based public television station National Educational Television (WNET), and one of the first black women to join the film editor’s union.

Anderson went on to become the in-house producer and director for Sesame Street and The Electric Company for the Children’s Television Workshop. During the early 1970s, she also helped create what would become WHUT-TV at Howard University, the country's first, and only, black-owned public television station. Anderson was critical of Hollywood and preferred to work outside of that system.

Anderson's credits also include: Assistant director/assistant editor of The Cool World (1964); producer/director of Malcolm X: Nationalist or Humanist? (1967); producer/director/editor/writer of I Am Somebody (1970); producer/director/editor of The Walls Came Tumbling Down (1975); executive producer of the series The Infinity Factory (1978); and senior producer/writer of the series Al Manahil (1987).